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adidas
08-21-07, 5:03 pm
decent article i found on fat

Dietary Fats - Know which types to choose.

Most foods contain several different kinds of fat — including saturated,
polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and trans fat — and some types are better foryour health than others are.

It's not necessary that you completely eliminate all fats from your meals.
Rather, choose the best types of fat and enjoy them in moderation.

Fat: A necessary nutrient
Your body needs fat to function properly. Besides being an energy source, fat is a nutrient used in the production of cell membranes, as well as in several hormone-like compounds called eicosanoids. These compounds help regulate blood pressure, heart rate, blood vessel constriction, blood clotting and the nervous system. In addition, dietary fat carries fat-soluble vitamins — vitamins A, D, E and K from your food into your body. Fat also helps maintain healthy hair and skin, protects vital organs, keeps your body insulated, and provides a sense of fullness after meals (satiety).

But too much fat can negatively impact your health. Eating large amounts of
high-fat foods adds excess calories, which can lead to weight gain and obesity. Obesity is a risk factor for several diseases, including diabetes, heart
disease, cancer, gallstones, sleep apnea and osteoarthritis. And too much of
certain types of fat — such as saturated fat or trans fat — can increase
your blood cholesterol levels and your risk of coronary artery disease.

Healthy fats
When choosing fats, your best options are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. These fats, if used in place of others, can lower your risk of heart disease by reducing the total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in your blood. Cholesterol, which your body produces for building cells, is the main substance in fatty deposits (plaques) that can develop in your arteries. Plaques that build up can reduce blood flow through your vessels, increasing your risk of heart disease and stroke.

One type of polyunsaturated fat, omega-3 fatty acids, may be especially
beneficial to your heart. Omega-3s appear to decrease the risk of coronary
artery disease. They may also protect against irregular heartbeats and help
lower blood pressure levels.
Here are the differences among these healthy fats as well as the best food
sources for each type:

Monounsaturated fat remains liquid at room temperature but may start to solidify in the refrigerator. Foods high in monounsaturated fat include olive, peanut and canola oils. Avocados and most nuts also have high amounts of monounsaturated fat.

Polyunsaturated fat is usually liquid at room temperature and in the
refrigerator. Foods high in polyunsaturated fats include vegetable oils, such as
safflower, corn, sunflower, soy and cottonseed oils.

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats found mostly in seafood. Good sources of omega 3s include fatty, cold-water fish, such as salmon, mackerel and herring. Flaxseeds, flax oil and walnuts also contain omega-3 fatty acids, and small amounts are found in soybean and canola oils.

Harmful fats
Saturated and trans fats are less healthy kinds of fats. They can increase your risk of heart disease by increasing your total and LDL ("bad") cholesterol.
Dietary cholesterol isn't technically a fat, but it's found in food derived from
animal sources. Intake of dietary cholesterol increases blood cholesterol
levels, but not as much as saturated and trans fats, and not to the same degreein all people. Here are how these fats differ and what their common food sources are:

Saturated fat. Usually solid or waxy at room temperature, saturated fat ismost often found in animal products — such as red meat, poultry, butter and
whole milk. Other foods high in saturated fat include coconut, palm and other
tropical oils.

Trans fat. Also referred to as trans-fatty acids, trans fat comes from adding hydrogen to vegetable oil through a process called hydrogenation. This makes the fat more solid and less likely to turn rancid. Hydrogenated fat is a common ingredient in commercial baked goods — such as crackers, cookies and cakes — and in fried foods such as doughnuts and french fries. Shortenings and some margarines also are high in trans fat. As of January 2006, food manufacturers are required to list trans fat content on nutrition labels. Amounts less than 0.5 grams per serving is listed as 0 grams trans fat on the food label.

Dietary cholesterol. Your body naturally manufactures all of the cholesterol it needs, but you also get cholesterol from animal products, such as meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, lard and butter.

A daily limit for fat intake
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommend that fat make up no more than 35 percent of your daily calories. This means that if you consume 1,800 calories a day, consume no more than 70 grams of fat a day. (To figure: Multiply 1,800 by 0.35 to get 630 calories, and divide that number by 9, the number of calories per gram of fat, to get 70 grams of total fat.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an upper limit and that most of these fat calories should come from monounsaturated and polyunsaturated sources.

In addition, the USDA and HHS recommend these upper limits for saturated fat and dietary cholesterol for healthy adults:

Saturated fat: Less than 10 percent of your total daily calories

Dietary cholesterol: Less than 300 milligrams a day

Though the USDA and HHS haven't yet established an upper limit for trans fat,
they do suggest that you keep your trans fat intake as low as possible. The
American Heart Association, on the other hand, has set an upper limit for trans fat — no more than 1 percent of your total daily calories.

Be aware that many foods contain different kinds of fat and varying levels of
each type. For example, butter contains unsaturated fats, but a large percentage of the total fat is saturated fat. And canola oil has a high percentage of monounsaturated fat, but also contains smaller amounts of polyunsaturated fat and saturated fat.

adidas
08-21-07, 5:04 pm
Tips for choosing the best types of fat
Limit fat in your diet, but don't try to cut it out completely. Focus on
reducing foods high in saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol, and select more foods made with unsaturated fats. Consider these tips when making your choices:

• Saute with olive oil instead of butter.
• Use olive oil instead of vegetable oil in salad dressings and marinades. Use
canola oil when baking.
• Sprinkle slivered nuts or sunflower seeds on salads instead of bacon bits.
• Snack on a small handful of nuts rather than potato chips or processed
crackers. Or try peanut butter or other nut-butter spreads — nonhydrogenated
— on celery, bananas, or rice or popcorn cakes.
• Add slices of avocado, rather than cheese, to your sandwich.
• Prepare fish such as salmon and mackerel, which contain monounsaturated and omega-3 fats, instead of meat one or two times a week.

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats have few adverse effects on blood
cholesterol levels, but you still need to consume all fats in moderation. Eating
large amounts of any fat adds excess calories. Fat contains 9 calories per gram, compared with 4 calories per gram for protein and carbohydrates. Also make sure that fatty foods don't replace more nutritious options, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes or whole grains.

adidas
08-21-07, 5:05 pm
i'm not 100% with this artical, as i believe Saturated fat has got a bad rap, that is undeserved. however 99% is accurate for the average joe and advid lifter.

Newbie
05-15-10, 1:42 pm
Got any ideas on fat sources?
Thanks.

Muscleguy93
05-15-10, 1:56 pm
Got any ideas on fat sources?
Thanks.

Eggs. Meat has fat aswell...

Fury317
05-15-10, 2:01 pm
Natural PB
Cashews
Almonds
Walnuts
Olive Oil
Omega 3 egg yolks
Fish Oil
Salmon filets
Avocados

Basically stay away from anything that says "trans" and limit saturated to 10% of total cals for the week

Beowulf
05-17-10, 2:41 pm
If you eat pretty clean, you'll get a lot of good fats from your diet. This assumes you add things like nuts, fish, oils, etc. If you eat really well, you won't need to "supplement" with any extra fats, though of course you could.

adidas
05-17-10, 3:33 pm
safflower oil
Coconut oil
Coconut milk
MCT oil
Macnut oil
Butter (real)
lecithin
Heavy whipping cram
Bacon (nitrate free)
Sausage (nitrate free)
olives
whole fat cheeses
Sour cream


those where just off the top of my head...

Fury317
05-17-10, 10:24 pm
safflower oil
Coconut oil
Coconut milk
MCT oil
Macnut oil
Butter (real)
lecithin
Heavy whipping cram
Bacon (nitrate free)
Sausage (nitrate free)
olives
whole fat cheeses
Sour cream


those where just off the top of my head...

Gotta limit those saturated though, too much evidence of health consequences, no matter what bro science you read that says they're "good" for you

adidas
05-18-10, 10:10 am
Gotta limit those saturated though, too much evidence of health consequences, no matter what bro science you read that says they're "good" for you

posted this along time ago: but since we are talking about Sat fats again...why not bring it back up. lol This is from another site...I don't know/remember the author

Just wanted to get this off my chest, i know alot of you know about fats, but I just had to see it here, so it might be discussed, whether you agree or dispute it, it's all good.

All fat sources found in nature have saturated fatty acids in them, this isn't new. Whether it's olives, nuts, grasses, flowers, seeds, plants, beef, fish, birds... saturated fatty acids is an intregal part of nature that has survived for 100's of thousands of years in our genome and millions of years for other spieces.

For example: 1 once of OLIVE OIL has 28 g's of fat, and about 4g's are saturated. Within those 4 g's most of the saturated fat is palmitic acid which has very minimal downward effects on LDL, but in the presents of linoleic acid which is a polyunsaturated fat also found in olive oil, it tends to negate those effects. So basically any potentially harmful effects of that particular sfa isomer is neutralized/minimalized. Now, the largest proportion 20 g's of the fatty acid in olive oil is oleic acid a monounsaturated fat which has positive effects on HDL. And most studies will agree, olive oil is good for us.

Another example: 100 g's (approx 1/4 lb) of SIRLOIN STEAK has 5.6 g's of fat and about 1.7 g's or about 1/3 is saturated, again it's mostly palmitic acid, but .2g's of that is stearic acid, which has positive effects on HDL. There's also .3 g's of linoleic acid a poly fat that has positive effects on HDL and lowers LDL. Combine that with the 2.5 g's of oleic acid which is the same acid found in olive oil, then we have 3.1 g's that has positive effects on HDL and 1.7 of saturated that have minimal effects on LDL at best. Popular opinion is it causes heart disease and a major reason for high cholesterol.

Another example:1 ounce of HYDROGENATED SOY OIL has 28g's of fat and 4.2 are saturated with palmitic acid counting for 2.7 g's and 1.4 is stearic acid these being the same sfa's as found in beef, again with positive/favorable overall effects on HDL/LDL. 12 g's are oleic acid the same found in olive oil and the beef, and 9.8 g's is linoleic acid again both of these having positive effects on HDL/LDL. Now generally accepted as the worst possible oil to use, period. Doesn't make sence, it looks perfectly fine.

Another example: 1 ounce of COCONUT OIL has 28 g's of fat and 24.2 are saturated fatty acids. 12.5 g's is lauric acid, which is a medium chain fatty acid and the other major one is myristic acid 5.0 g's with 2.0 of palmitic 2.0 caprylic acid 1.7 capric acid, with a few smaller ones. 1.6 g's of oleic a mono fat and .5 of linoleic poly fat. Present company excepted, most of the general puplic believes this is a heart attach waiting to happen. At least that's what the soy board told the public....whoops did i say that out loud.

Another example: 1 ounce of BEEF LARD has 28 g's of fat and 12.5 are saturated with 6.5 g's of palmitic acid and 4.7 stearic acid and .8 caprylic acid
The mono fats are 10.5 of oleic acid, again the same as olive oil, and linoleic acid a poly fat....so again the amount of benefical oils here outweight the possible and minimal effects of palmitic acid. Another death on a plate. Why?

**Discrepencies in total fat g's is because of small/tiny isomers that I haven't calculated in.**

Fury317
05-18-10, 12:35 pm
posted this along time ago: but since we are talking about Sat fats again...why not bring it back up. lol This is from another site...I don't know/remember the author

I know you're just posting the info, so I dont want to get into it or anything, but if a person can't spell "sense" or "attack", I am for sure not taking nutritional advice from them haha. I don't want to come off as "saturated fats are bad" but you do have to limit them.

Aggression
05-18-10, 12:49 pm
I typically use the following fats in my diet, daily:

extra virgin olive oil (to cook eggs in)
natural peanut butter
unsalted dry roasted nuts

Beowulf
05-18-10, 1:07 pm
In theory, can saturated fats provide benefits? Sure. Saturated fats, along with trans fats, have received their fair share of negative attention. Does this mean we should indulge in more saturated fats? That's the real question, isn't it? You have to balance theory and praxis. The reality is, most Americans overindulge in saturated fats. Therefore, to promote saturated fat use is not necessarily a good thing. In general, you should try to remove trans fats from your diet and limit saturated fats to a degree IMHO.

adidas
05-18-10, 1:15 pm
I know you're just posting the info, so I dont want to get into it or anything, but if a person can't spell "sense" or "attack", I am for sure not taking nutritional advice from them haha. I don't want to come off as "saturated fats are bad" but you do have to limit them.

true and some one who forgets an apostrophy in their sentence shouldn't be listen to either for their nutritonal advice...bolded for ease of viewing for those who wish to limit nutritional advice for common spelling/grammatical errors...


what? oh I'm not trying to get into or anything...just saying is all ;-)

adidas
05-18-10, 1:19 pm
The reality is, most Americans overindulge in saturated fats.

American overindulge in shitty fast foods, laced with trans fats and over-processed carbs...and consume a caloric surplus above and beyond what one needs on a daily basis...Saturaded fats is NOT the problem here....

Beowulf
05-18-10, 1:51 pm
American overindulge in shitty fast foods, laced with trans fats and over-processed carbs...and consume a caloric surplus above and beyond what one needs on a daily basis...Saturaded fats is NOT the problem here....

Saturated fats can, indeed, be a problem. Anything in excess can.

adidas
05-18-10, 2:44 pm
Saturated fats can, indeed, be a problem. Anything in excess can.
Thank you for illustrating my point for me...

Beowulf
05-18-10, 6:11 pm
Thank you for illustrating my point for me...

Return the favor next time, cool?

adidas
05-18-10, 8:40 pm
Return the favor next time, cool?

did you say flavor?

I like mine to taste like bacon!

Beowulf
05-19-10, 10:24 am
did you say flavor?

I like mine to taste like bacon!

Scrapple. Give that a try.