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IRN-NML
11-16-08, 10:22 am
Just some thoughts.

Much as I appreciate this iron insight, I can't say I always adhered or come back to it enough; put simply, 'make every rep count'.

This has got to be, I believe, a big part in crossing the line from lifting and being in good shape and bodybuilding (or powerlifting) lifting.

Maybe form overall is ok, but sometimes I'll think say, rep 5 or 7 or both were half assed because I maybe didn't squeeze at the top, or go low/deep enough or kind of let the weight drop a bit vs lowering it; any number of things. Not totally mentally, physically sloppy but not disciplined, focused throughout the set. Sort of easier said than done, but still, that can't be an excuse.

Even if it means stripping the weight 10, 20 or whatever lbs, even for an old guy who's lifted long enough and should know better, the idea of racking up as many 'perfect' sets in session......that requires making each sets' reps all count; seems like a fresh concept.

It's gotta be more than just cranking out x sets times x reps per set @ some big number weight. If you're going to craft your body, gotta treat pumping the iron as a craft to hone and perfect (I'm telling this to myself; not lecturing any of you).

Just my 1c.

Histo55
11-16-08, 10:36 am
i couldn't agree more with you!

Psycho77
11-16-08, 10:42 am
i couldn't agree more with you!


X2

a rep for me required proper form perfectly executed irregardless of the weight used.

pmug0000
11-16-08, 2:02 pm
I don't completely agree. Just because some reps don't have textbook form doesn't mean they are half-assed. On certain lifts like BB rows, curls, and lateral raises, adding in a few extra 'cheat reps' at the end of the set is gonna cause more muscle stimulation than stopping the set once your form isn't picture perfect.

IRN-NML
11-16-08, 2:31 pm
I don't completely agree. Just because some reps don't have textbook form doesn't mean they are half-assed. On certain lifts like BB rows, curls, and lateral raises, adding in a few extra 'cheat reps' at the end of the set is gonna cause more muscle stimulation than stopping the set once your form isn't picture perfect.

Actually, I agree with you. And fighting a last rep or even the last two reps with a tough but not idiotic amount of weight isn't half assed either. Also, not implying reps have to be 'smith machine cookie cutter' identical.

I've just caugh myself thinking after a set sometimes 'there were some crappy reps in there'. Doesn't take long to get through a normal set & thus, easy not to really think about each rep. Then, when done, you're either thinking bout the next set, or spotting your partner or just chilling vs giving a little thought on how the set went.

I do agree with your points!

NickSP
11-16-08, 4:06 pm
To play devil's advocate...

let's say I hit 6 reps with my first weight and then 2 more reps without as perfect form

now let's say I do drop 10 lbs like you say so I can "use good form"...now I hit all 8 reps with good form, but there's still a limit. No matter how low the weight is, there's a limit to how many reps you can do with good form... people just tend to add more "imperfect" reps beyond the textbook set to make the muscle do any extra bit of work they can accomplish.

Aggression
11-17-08, 12:16 pm
To play devil's advocate...

let's say I hit 6 reps with my first weight and then 2 more reps without as perfect form

now let's say I do drop 10 lbs like you say so I can "use good form"...now I hit all 8 reps with good form, but there's still a limit. No matter how low the weight is, there's a limit to how many reps you can do with good form... people just tend to add more "imperfect" reps beyond the textbook set to make the muscle do any extra bit of work they can accomplish.

right on

MRoush
11-17-08, 2:01 pm
I would say it depends on the exercise. I tend to use a little "body english" when doing front db raises to help get the weight up on the last few reps. BUT! I make sure I hold it at the top for 1/2 second or so to get that burn in, plus let it back down slowly to complete the rep.

Brick By Brick
11-17-08, 2:21 pm
I can justify both schools of thought. I try to do the majority of my reps with the best form possible, and will gladly strip weight if it's too heavy, and my form is ridiculous. On the other hand, I've done sets with a little more weight and horsed the bar more so than is recommended, just for the sheer strength building aspect. It's kind of a fine line, and you have to be careful, but I've had good results with both practices. IMHO.

IRN-NML
11-17-08, 10:36 pm
Didn't intend to push an absolute here. Sometimes fighting for the last rep or two with some cheat is a valid, natural part of the iron game. I was more referring to sometimes, say, in a set of 10 reps, I've gotten lazy on some before the last few; maybe not going down enough or close enough ...whatever. I remember when I had a much much stronger training partner years ago he paid attention to every rep I did on anything. Now & then I'd hear "That rep sucked" & smart or not, he usually made sure I tacked on a make up rep.

There's a bodybuilder with a site; Pete Ciccone whom I recall saying his goal is to make every rep count. A recent T-Nation article 'My 5 'ah ha moments' by Mike Robertson; one of the 'moments' is entitled 'Before You Can Be Strong You Must Be Weak'. My OP was posted with these in mind.

futilekyle
11-17-08, 11:10 pm
I think I see what your saying here, its like u locked in on rep 3 and 4 but rep 5 and 6 you were less focused, still using good form but its like you could have been concentrating harder on each rep to make them the best, its not a question of form, more of focus.