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View Full Version : Does the amount of time training really matter?



mr.bump
12-15-09, 11:05 am
Am asking this because allot of people say it does and that you shouldn't go past an hour when lifting weights .

But the man who owns my gym he does some long workouts.Now hes big no bb big but hes still big but at the same time he doesn't seem strong I always see him on the smith machine benching around 60kg.

Any way this is the sort of workout he does
he was doing chest with one of his friends bench flys some sort of cable exercise took them about an hour,any way after this he comes up to me and says am doing biceps for 40 mins if ye want to join me.I just thought that sounded weird an just finished of my own stuff.

The next day hes just doing pull ups for like an hour or longer ,I came in the gym done chest triceps shoulders and like 10 mins on the tread mill an he was just doing pullups .

So what do use think does it matter how long you train for as long as you get enough food and maybe one day off a week it shouldnt matterhow long you train should it ?

GJN5002
12-15-09, 11:40 am
def matters, Remember you are breaking down muscle fiber in the gym so you want to hit it hard and leave to recover. Ive read that the bodies hormonal response changes somewhere around the hour mark( 45 min - hour), producing more cortisol, you start running out of glycogen, entering into a catabolic state, lactic acid builds up, the blood becomes more acidic etc etc. Once I get my warm up in I usually work out for about 40 min on a normal day, heavy days are a bit longer because I rest more.

mr.bump
12-15-09, 11:56 am
Is there a time limit intil your next workout ? say If you wanted to do 2 workouts one day (different body parts) How long should you wait ? Ive herd if your doing the weights and then you want to do cardio your best doing the cardio 6 hours later

rev8ball
12-15-09, 12:12 pm
Intensity over time is what matters. You can spend an hour in gym, but if you spend 15 minutes inbetween sets shooting the shit with the gym bimbo, then it's not an hour. This leads also to training goals. Training for strength and power requires more rest between sets than training for endurance or hypertrophy, for example.

mritter3
12-15-09, 12:14 pm
im a big believer in getting in and getting out....after so long its just overkill, and the more time you spend tearing your body down, the more time it needs to repair itself, so i like to be in and out in under 1.5hours...but thats just me. to each his/her own.

C.Coronato
12-15-09, 12:32 pm
im a big believer in getting in and getting out....after so long its just overkill, and the more time you spend tearing your body down, the more time it needs to repair itself, so i like to be in and out in under 1.5hours...but thats just me. to each his/her own.

Agreed. Im the same way brother. But like M said .. to each his own.

wedge
12-15-09, 1:25 pm
Get in, put your head down and do work. My workouts vary between 45 minutes to an hour and a half, determined by how I am feeling that day and what I am training.
There is no magic number. Just note that you can't keep your intensity levels that high for that long.
Per the session split question, I am doing cardio in that a.m, 5ish and then hitting the weights at night. Give yourself time to recover and do not do cardio on the same day you plan on doing legs.

live2lift
12-15-09, 1:47 pm
Intensity over time is what matters. You can spend an hour in gym, but if you spend 15 minutes inbetween sets shooting the shit with the gym bimbo, then it's not an hour. This leads also to training goals. Training for strength and power requires more rest between sets than training for endurance or hypertrophy, for example.

One of the smartest brothas on the forum speaks again. Take what this man says as golden...he knows his shit. It depends on goals, but ultimately you need to make sure that you are training with intensity. For example my goal is hypertrophy and I have been doing this training for a month or so now where I train for about 1 hour but I do not rest...period. If you think it is easy, try it for yourself. Train one or two bodyparts for one hour straight...no rest. Kinda like circuit training but you still lift as heavy as possible...if you tell me that it is not intense then you didn't do it right.

Peace

mr.bump
12-15-09, 5:09 pm
how many hours would use say you should rest befor going onto your next weight lifting session ?

live2lift
12-15-09, 5:20 pm
how many hours would use say you should rest befor going onto your next weight lifting session ?

This is going to be something that will be different for everyone. Me personally, I train one day, rest the next, train, etc...

prowrestler
12-15-09, 6:16 pm
the time you need to train is 100% individual


a 180 pound 19 year old basket ball player and a 308 pound powerlifter who benchs 800lbs will have a way different training time. due to goals and strength.

if your doin what it takes to get strong and you actually are improving, who gives a fuck what a little circle with 2 arms and numbers says?

JasonG
12-15-09, 6:54 pm
An hour of pull ups sounds insane. What is his rest between sets like? I'm a believer in getting in the gym, hit it hard/break a sweat and get out. Time varies but averages an hour with a good amount of volume. I think with experience you'll know how long you need to be in there.

mr.bump
12-16-09, 9:13 am
He was jsut walking around and then doig more when he could think he was doin around 5 each time.

I dont know if he does this because he thinks it works or because hes bored.

JasonG
12-16-09, 5:46 pm
He was jsut walking around and then doig more when he could think he was doin around 5 each time.

I dont know if he does this because he thinks it works or because hes bored.

Hmm sounds like just spinning your wheels and going nowhere to me. Not something I would do but to each his own...

Beowulf
12-16-09, 5:49 pm
Train hard, get a pump, get the work done and you're done. How can you set an fixed time limit on lifting?

mr.bump
12-17-09, 8:37 am
/\ but as people have said here you can workout to long

Appollonian
12-17-09, 8:57 am
how many hours would use say you should rest befor going onto your next weight lifting session ?

I prefer not to do two workouts in a day, but if it can't be avoided, I would say do your first workout upon waking, and then 12-14 hrs later do your second one. And don't forget to eat properly so you'd be fueled up.

You could also consider splicing two of your workouts together and cut time by doing a more high intensity version of your workout. I wouldn't recommend doing chest with quads, but maybe shoulders with arms, or back with triceps, something like that.

As for overall time working out, from what I've seen and personally experienced, I like to get in and out in less than 50 minutes not including cardio. I work out hard enough so that the last set(s) I am doing are light because I can't generate the force to move anything heavy anymore.

Alk
12-18-09, 3:24 am
/\ but as people have said here you can workout to long

But it's something you have to find out on your own. I've gone as short as an hour, and as long as two and a half myself, it's just something you gotta find out for yourself man.

nateisw
12-18-09, 3:55 am
Doing an hour of pull-ups is just weird. I think a lot of the guys who've responded have already hit the nail on the head...If I'm lifting by myself, my workouts are usually 25-40 minutes, depending on what bodypart I doing. If I'm only doing biceps, for example, my workout is around 25 minutes, versus maybe 40 minutes for chest or legs. My workout times are usually longer if I lift with a partner though.
Some people need longer workouts than this; back when I was powerlifting, I would spend one and a half to two hours just doing deadlifts, sometimes sitting on the floor and stretching for 15-20 minutes between sets.

Off the topic, I'm pretty stoked today because I just bought a used squat rack, bench, olympic bar, and 170 pounds of weight for $100. I'm gonna leave all this stuff at the fire station where I work. We already have some equipment there and with this gear added to it, we can finally get some real workouts in while we're on the job.

BSill
12-18-09, 4:49 am
I guess it can vary pending on how your body reacts to your routine that session & what parts you are hitting that day.

For example: I'll keep it to 3 exercises a body part (except for leg day). Say I'm working tri's. I'll usually do 6 sets of skull crushers as my first tricep lift, however if I'm feeling the a continuously increasing pump, then I'll do another 3 sets until I begin to feel its maxing out. Then I'll switch to rope/cable pull downs. If this happens for, say, 4 different exercises it might push me another 20 minutes over my workout time. But if I'm feeling the pump increase that day, then I don't see a reason to move on so quickly.

Then again, if I only do 5 sets of skull crushers, and by the time I'm on my 6th set of close grip and I feel thats enough and that the muscle is spent, then thats it for that muscle that day, and such may cut that muscle workout session by 10 minutes.

IMO it all depends on how your feeling and reacting to the weight that day. But I find that most workouts I do go from 1.5 hrs to 2hrs. But it varies per person.

JustRIOT
12-19-09, 3:48 am
I Usually train from 2 to 3 hours in the gym, and that includes from warming up in the beginning and 15 minute cardio at the end. I used to work out for an hour and a half before, but by extending my time in the gym, i actually got more results on the part i was destroyin.

but to each his own. as long as you push yourself
cuz if you are not sore the next day, then you didnt work out.

NaturalTrainee
01-03-10, 5:19 am
I Usually train from 2 to 3 hours in the gym, and that includes from warming up in the beginning and 15 minute cardio at the end. I used to work out for an hour and a half before, but by extending my time in the gym, i actually got more results on the part i was destroyin.

but to each his own. as long as you push yourself
cuz if you are not sore the next day, then you didnt work out.

No. After one hour of intense exercise the cortisol's production is raised and your gains are threatened. Read about it and you'll see.
If you are not sore next day it doesn't mean anything. You could have ignited growth whatsoever.

BryanSmash!
01-03-10, 5:47 am
Intensity over time is what matters. You can spend an hour in gym, but if you spend 15 minutes inbetween sets shooting the shit with the gym bimbo, then it's not an hour. This leads also to training goals. Training for strength and power requires more rest between sets than training for endurance or hypertrophy, for example.


to each his/her own.


to each his own.


Get in, put your head down and do work.
There is no magic number. Just note that you can't keep your intensity levels that high for that long.



This is going to be something that will be different for everyone.


the time you need to train is 100% individual



to each his own...


How can you set an fixed time limit on lifting?


it's just something you gotta find out for yourself man.


it varies per person.



but to each his own.


^ Follow their advice.

ironshaolin
01-04-10, 3:14 pm
Studies have PROVEN that workouts lasting longer than 45-60 mins enhance cortisol production, and testosterone levels begin to decrease. IF you're looking to build muscle or get strong, this is NOT what you want.

Rest days has to do with YOU and YOU alone. I believe that when you workout, you should feel the initial fatigue after your workout, but within 3-5 hours after I'm done, I'm usually fired up and feeling like training again. Experiment. MOST people, with AVERAGE genetics, will do good with 3-4 days a week. SOME freaks will have the recovery capacity to train 5-6, and a few hard gainers will do better on only 2x a week.

I reccomend starting with 3 days a week. If after 2-3 months on a 3 day, you feel that you're energized and pumped from training, try going to a 4 day routine. If that makes you feel worn out, you lose motivation, then go back to 3 days. If opposite, try for 5 days. If training 3 days a week has you feeling fried, try a 2 day. I've found for myself, 5 and 6 day routines were wayyyy too much, I was always sore, always tired, and poorly motivated. 4 day routines I can do good on, as long as I'm not really training elsewhere. If I have martial arts/outdoor activites, etc...that are physical, I do my best on 2 or 3 day routines.

NaturalTrainee
01-04-10, 3:55 pm
Another critical question: Why should someone bother with more, when precision is os important in the world of iron?
Bottom line, the time matters. Less than 60 minutes or you begin hurting your gains.

The_Legacy
01-04-10, 5:01 pm
Not everyone is the same. if your a beginner i'd start off with 45mins though.